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Explanation Text Type

 

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Explanation

Purpose An explanation is used to tell how or why something happens

Structure The three parts of an explanation are:

·          A general statement which describes or identifies the phenomenon

·          A series of statements that tell how or why the feature or process changes. Words should show cause and effect.

·          A conclusion/application sums up the explanation and talks about its applications; may also give examples

Explanation Scaffold

Introduction – identify the phenomenon, giving a summary
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Explanation (how and why) sequence
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Language features of an explanation
Technical terms - evaporation, degradation
Action verbs and present tense - runs, develops, becomes
Passive voice - water is pulled up..
Cause and effect terms - because of.., due to.., therefore, as a result
Examples of an explanation
How something happened; why something occurred; why things are similar or different
Life cycle of an insect; how a dynamo works; process of making iron ore
References:
Greef, C. (1995). Summary of school text types in science [Draft]. Disadvantaged Schools Program
Anderson, M. & Anderson, K. (1997). Text types in English 1. Macmillan: South Yarra.
Anderson, M. & Anderson, K. (1997). Text types in English 2. Macmillan: South Yarra.
Literacy Committee, St Andrew’s Cathedral School