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Discussion Text Type

 

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Discussion

Purpose A discussion  is used to present different opinions on a particular issue or topic ie arguments for and against/positive and negative/good and bad.

Structure The three parts of a discussion are:

·          An introductory paragraph that introduces topic/issue – may state writer’s view.

·          A series of paragraphs that outline arguments for and against the issue or topic. Words should show comparison/contrast and link arguments.

.          A conclusion sums up issues and presents writer’s point of view and/or recommendations.

Discussion Scaffold

 

Introduction  -statement of issue and preview of arguments for and against a topic

………………………………………………………

Arguments for……………………………………………………

……………………………………………………...

Arguments against……………………………………………..

……………………………………………………..

Evaluation………………………………………....

Recommendation………………………………...

 

Language features of a discussion
Generic terms relevant to the subject – degradation, conservation,
Use of comparison and contrast words – also, as, like, similar to; although, differs from, however,
Use of linking words – on the other hand, although, in contrast to, this is supported by, in spite of, however,
Language indicating judgement and values – very funny, depressing,
Examples of a discussion
Debates, letters to the editor, some articles, talkback radio
References:
Greef, C. (1995). Summary of school text types in science [Draft]. Disadvantaged Schools Program
Anderson, M. & Anderson, K. (1997). Text types in English 1. Macmillan: South Yarra.
Anderson, M. & Anderson, K. (1997). Text types in English 2. Macmillan: South Yarra.
Literacy Committee, St Andrew’s Cathedral School